Do Cat Have Baby Teeth Falling Out

Kittens are born without any teeth. Over the first months of life, they develop baby teeth which eventually fall out. These deciduous or “milk” teeth are gradually replaced by permanent adult teeth starting around 3-4 months of age. The process of losing baby teeth and growing new permanent teeth is known as teething.

Kittens first grow 26 deciduous or baby teeth, which start coming in around 2-4 weeks of age. By around 6-7 months old, these milk teeth begin falling out as the permanent teeth erupt. Adult cats have 30 permanent teeth, so the teething process involves the baby teeth falling out while the new permanent teeth come in.

Kittens Are Born Without Teeth

Kittens are born toothless. They do not have any teeth at birth, unlike some mammals like horses and dolphins that are born with some teeth. Kittens’ gums are smooth, and they rely on suckling their mother’s milk for nourishment in the first weeks after birth.

According to the VCA Hospitals, “The deciduous teeth start erupting through the gums at around three weeks of age and are normally finished erupting by 6 to 8 weeks of age.” (https://vcahospitals.com/know-your-pet/retained-deciduous-teeth-baby-teeth-in-cats)

Since kittens do not have any teeth initially, they are unable to eat solid food right away and rely exclusively on nursing to get the nutrition they need.

Kittens Develop Baby Teeth

Kittens are born without any teeth. Around 2-4 weeks of age, kittens will start to develop their baby or deciduous teeth (Hill’s Pet Nutrition, 2022). These are often referred to as milk teeth or needle teeth. Kittens have a total of 26 deciduous or baby teeth that start coming in between 3-6 weeks of age. The incisors are usually the first teeth to erupt. The baby teeth help kittens transition from nursing to solid food.

Kittens Have 26 Baby Teeth

Kittens are born without any teeth. At around 2-4 weeks of age, they start to develop their baby or deciduous teeth, also known as milk teeth or primary teeth. Kittens will have a total of 26 deciduous teeth, with 14 teeth on the top jaw and 12 on the bottom jaw [1]. The deciduous teeth help kittens transition from nursing to eating solid food. They also aid in playing, biting, and learned social behavior.

The 26 deciduous teeth include:

  • 12 incisors (6 on top, 6 on bottom)
  • 4 canines (2 on top, 2 on bottom)
  • 16 premolars (8 on top, 8 on bottom)

These deciduous teeth are smaller and whiter than adult teeth. They help the kitten grasp, bite, and chew food until the permanent adult teeth erupt and replace them.

Kittens Start Losing Baby Teeth Around 3-4 Months

Kittens are born without any teeth. Around 2-4 weeks old, their baby teeth start to erupt. Kittens have a total of 26 deciduous (baby) teeth. By about 12-16 weeks old, those baby teeth become loose and begin to fall out as the permanent adult teeth start pushing up from below. According to Mountainaire Animal Clinic, most kittens will have lost all of their baby teeth by around 6 months old.

The age when kittens start losing their baby teeth can vary a bit from cat to cat, but in general you can expect them to start becoming loose and falling out around 12-16 weeks or 3-4 months old. According to WellPet, this is often the most intense teething period for kittens. It’s important to provide teething toys and surfaces during this time to help relieve sore gums and ease the teething process.

Permanent Teeth Come In

Permanent teeth start coming in when kittens are around 4-7 months old. Kittens start losing their baby teeth around 3-4 months old, which makes room for the permanent teeth to erupt. The permanent incisors start coming in first between 4-6 months old. The permanent canine teeth come in next around 5-7 months old. By 6-7 months old, all of the permanent incisors and canines have come in. The permanent premolars and molars start erupting between 5-8 months old. Most kittens will have all 30 of their permanent teeth around 6-9 months old.

Kittens Have 30 Permanent Teeth

Adult cats have 30 permanent teeth, which they get as their kitten teeth fall out and are replaced. According to Purina, the 30 permanent teeth are made up of:

  • 12 incisors – the small, front teeth used for biting and gnawing
  • 4 canines – the pointed teeth behind the incisors used for grabbing prey
  • 10 premolars – broader teeth behind the canines used for chewing and grinding
  • 4 molars – the large, rear teeth used for grinding food

Kittens are born without any teeth. They start getting their baby teeth (deciduous teeth) around 2-4 weeks of age. Kittens have 26 deciduous teeth. By around 4 months old, kittens start shedding their baby teeth as the permanent adult teeth grow in behind them. The full set of 30 permanent teeth is usually finished growing in by around 6-7 months old.

According to VCA Hospitals, issues can sometimes occur if baby teeth don’t properly fall out. This is called retained deciduous teeth. It’s important to monitor your kitten’s teeth as they transition from baby to permanent teeth.

Tooth Eruption Schedule

Kittens are born without any teeth. At around 2-3 weeks of age, their first set of baby teeth called deciduous teeth start to erupt. The incisors are usually the first baby teeth to come in. By 6-7 weeks old, kittens have a full set of 26 deciduous teeth including incisors, canines and premolars Kitten Teeth.

Deciduous teeth start falling out and being replaced by permanent teeth starting around 12-16 weeks of age. The incisors are replaced first, followed by the canines and premolars. By around 6-7 months old, all of the permanent teeth have erupted to replace the deciduous teeth. An adult cat will have 30 permanent teeth Tooth eruption and exfoliation in dogs and cats.

The eruption schedule is as follows:

  • 2-3 weeks: Deciduous incisors start erupting
  • 3-4 weeks: Deciduous canines start erupting
  • 4-6 weeks: Deciduous premolars start erupting
  • 6-7 weeks: Full set of 26 deciduous teeth
  • 12-16 weeks: Permanent incisors start erupting
  • 16-20 weeks: Permanent canines start erupting
  • 20-24 weeks: Permanent premolars start erupting
  • 24+ weeks: Full set of 30 permanent teeth

Caring For Teeth During Transition

Kittens need extra care and attention when their baby teeth are falling out and adult teeth are erupting. Here are some tips for caring for your kitten’s teeth during this transition period:

Monitor for signs of teething pain like drooling, chewing, and reluctance to eat. You can provide frozen washcloths for the kitten to chew on for temporary pain relief. Massaging the gums with a clean finger can also help soothe sore gums 1.

Gently wipe the kitten’s teeth daily with a soft cloth or finger brush to remove any food debris. This helps keep teeth and gums clean while new teeth are erupting. Avoid harsh scrubbing during sensitive teething periods 2.

Provide chew toys made of rope, rubber, or dental treats to help soothe gums and reduce teething pain. Avoid toys that could break into sharp pieces. Monitor chewing to prevent choking 3.

Feed wet food during teething as it’s easier to chew and swallow. Kittens may temporarily struggle with hard kibble while teeth are loose. You can also soften kibble in water to make it easier to chew 1.

Schedule a vet exam if signs of teething pain persist more than a few days or if you notice swollen, bleeding gums, retained baby teeth, or difficulty eating. Usually kittens handle teething discomfort well with minimal care.

With plenty of chew toys, soft foods, and TLC, you can help your kitten through the discomfort of losing baby teeth and getting permanent adult teeth.

Conclusion

In summary, kittens are born without any teeth. Around 2-4 weeks old, they start to develop their baby teeth, which are small, needle-like milk teeth. Kittens have a total of 26 deciduous or baby teeth that start to erupt around 3-4 weeks of age. These milk teeth begin falling out around 3-4 months old and are slowly replaced by permanent adult teeth. By around 6-7 months old, kittens have their full set of 30 permanent teeth. It’s important to monitor your kitten’s teeth during this transition period and provide proper dental care. With patience and gentle brushing, you can ensure your kitten’s teeth stay healthy and strong.

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